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Weaver Quarter Horses celebrates annual sale and legacy

Weaver Quarter Horses celebrates annual sale
Stan Weaver is keeping his family’s name alive with the 27th annual Weaver Quarter Horse sale.
Posted at 9:02 AM, Sep 18, 2022

Since 1888 the Weaver Family name has ruled the Montana range. Stan Weaver is keeping his family’s name alive with the 27th annual Weaver Quarter Horse sale.

“Five brothers came to Montana in 1887 and they actually cowboy’d in the Judith there with Charlie Russell; became good friends with Charlie Russell,” he said.

“Our brand was recorded in 1888 which is the year before Montana became a state. And my grandkids are the sixth generation of weavers to ride horses under that brand.”

All cow-bred horses, he tries breeding for good bone structure, speed, and stamina.

A reputation his horses have earned.

Stan Weaver is keeping his family’s name alive with the 27th annual Weaver Quarter Horse sale.
Stan Weaver is keeping his family’s name alive with the 27th annual Weaver Quarter Horse sale.

“Normally when you get a weaver horse it's not like, oh those are super good cutting horses and those are super good. But I mean, they can be, or they are super good rein-cow horses. It's like, oh, if I bought a Weaver horse, it might be able to go into a ton of different directions,” said Kelly-Anne Terry, Weaver’s daughter.

The passion for breeding horses has stretched generations.

Stan Weaver’s, granddaughter, Avery Terry is hoping to follow in her grandpa’s footsteps.

“My grandfather can name any of the mares in course just by looking at the coal, or we'll see can say, oh, I can see where this is from. I really want to learn how to relate to them like my grandfather does.” Shared Avery.

The horse sale was a family affair. Numerous branches of the Weaver family tree helped make the auction a success.

The day started with a preview of the livestock for sale, colts, and saddle broken horses were on the menu. Following the preview, the auction began in the early afternoon.

Kayla Weston, from Alberta, Canada is one of the many who traveled miles to shop for horses. She is the wife of PRCA roper, Clint Weston.

The owner of multiple Weaver horses said, “The Weavers have just a very consistent group of young horses. Any of them that we've bought, we know what we're getting and so when we spend our money, we want to make sure it's a good investment. And they all have been.”

Alberta is relatively close considering the others who were attendance, including some from Georgia and Michigan to name a few.

“We've sold horses to all 50 states, seven Canadian provinces, Australia, Germany, South Africa, Mexico, all because of our sale here in Great Falls.” said Stan.

“You just want to promote the horse. And I think that that's the thing that's most special about it, is promoting the horse, the quarter horse, and promoting the Western way of life,” said Kelly-Anne Terry, adding, “and bringing it to people who might not experience, or this is how they experience it this way.”

“It's kind of humbling in a way. You know, they're coming this far to, you know, buy our breed of horses.” Weaver concluded.


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