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Diapers, feminine hygiene products are no longer taxed in Colorado

Reatail Shopping
Posted at 12:28 PM, Aug 10, 2022
and last updated 2022-08-10 14:28:00-04

DENVER — Beginning Wednesday, diapers, pads, and tampons will no longer be taxed in Colorado.

Governor Jared Polis signed the landmark bipartisan law on June 3, which exempted sales tax for adult and baby diapers and feminine hygiene products, including tampons and pads.

Polis said the new law is one of the 100 ways his administration and the legislature are helping Coloradans save money.

“From now on in Colorado, there will no longer be state sales tax on diapers and feminine hygiene products. This new bi-partisan law finally ends the sales tax on diapers and feminine hygiene products permanently and starts saving people money on these necessary products,” said Governor Polis in a press release.

The bill was sponsored by two female state representatives and two female state senators.

“Too many Coloradans and their families are going without necessary hygiene products, and this law eliminates the state sales tax on these essential products, making them more affordable," said bill co-sponsor Democratic Rep. Leslie Herod. “Eliminating the sales and use tax on period products, diapers, and incontinence products makes these essential products more accessible and saves Coloradans money when they need it the most. Our law also paves the way towards destigmatizing hygiene products that millions of people rely on every day.”

ABC affiliate KMGH reported that the state expects the new tax exemption to cost them roughly $4.3 million in lost sales tax revenue in the first year and $9.1 million in the next.

Women's Foundation of Colorado estimates that individuals spend about $15 per month on female hygiene products, CBS News reported.

The bill received bipartisan support in the state legislature, passing the Senate in May with a 26-9 vote and the House passing it in March with a 50-13 vote.

Polis also announced Tuesday that new laws that would cut taxes for child care centers, early childhood educators, and seniors will begin this week.