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World War II Chaplains remembered at Malmstrom Air Force Base - KXLH.com | Helena, Montana

World War II Chaplains remembered at Malmstrom Air Force Base

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The Four Chaplains Memorial Service honors the memories of four chaplains who willingly gave up their lives to save others. The Four Chaplains Memorial Service honors the memories of four chaplains who willingly gave up their lives to save others.
The chaplains were Lt. George L. Fox, Methodist; Lt. Alexander D. Goode, Jewish; Lt. John P. Washington, Roman Catholic; and Lt. Clark V. Poling, Dutch Reformed. The chaplains were Lt. George L. Fox, Methodist; Lt. Alexander D. Goode, Jewish; Lt. John P. Washington, Roman Catholic; and Lt. Clark V. Poling, Dutch Reformed.
MALMSTROM AIR FORCE BASE -

Airmen and civilians came together on Friday at Malmstrom Air Force Base to remember four chaplains who died during World War II.

The Four Chaplains Memorial Service honors the memories of four chaplains who willingly gave up their lives to save others. 

Chaplain (Captain) Charles Kim organized the service. 

"As a chaplain it is very inspiring to really pay tribute to these four chaplains who are way before my time. Their story is a heroic story. They did live out their faith and that led them to give up there lives so they can literally save lives of other soldiers and service members," Kim said. 

On February 3rd, 1943, the U.S. Army transport ship Dorchester was torpedoed by a German submarine.

Of the 902  servicemen, merchant seamen, and civilian workers aboard, there were only 227 survivors. 

According to witnesses, the four Army chaplains brought hope in despair and light in darkness. Those chaplains were Lt. George L. Fox, Methodist; Lt. Alexander D. Goode, Jewish; Lt. John P. Washington, Roman Catholic; and Lt. Clark V. Poling, Dutch Reformed.

The four chaplains spread out among the soldiers, and tried to calm the frightened, tend the wounded, and guide the disoriented toward safety.

Captain Kim said, "One chaplain even went as far as giving up his own gloves. He told this soldier, 'Hey take my gloves,' because of the freezing conditions. The chaplain told him, 'No, I have got my own so take mine,' and the soldier knew the chaplain did not have gloves. Even at the smallest level these chaplains were so willing to go way above the call of duty to really serve and save lives on that day."

Survivors recall the image of the four chaplains, arms linked and braced against the slanted deck.

As the ship sank, they were heard praying and offering words of encouragement and hope for the lives of the men, each according to his individual faith tradition.

Click here to learn more at the Four Chaplains website.

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